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Fowl Play – Interview and Review

Culture, Events, Interviews, Performance, Performance, Reviews, Showcase, Tech

September 20, 2017

Interactive theatre pieces are amazing. It gives people the chance to be creative and think outside of themselves to get to the final goal. Entertaining others while entertaining yourselves.

Interactive theatre is also hard to do. You have to account for a bunch of variables, those variables have a name, and that name is audiences.

Telling is a story that is compelling enough to entice your audience enough to participate but having a narrative that doesn’t NEED them to do the most important tasks is important. Making sure that what your actors do makes sense in the context of the narrative is paramount. Matchstick Productions did the important things and left room for you to play with the characters in their production of Fowl Play.

Photo Credit – Luke Redmond – Fowl Play

“Fowl Play: a Search for Odd Behaviour and Even Odder People,” is an interactive theatre performance that will be presented at the Anvil centre as a response to the New Westminster New Media Gallery’s current exhibition “Dominion.” Come join us with your smartphones and be on the lookout for some pesky birds in this one-of-a-kind scavenger hunt!

I was invited to participate on an audience level with this production by Judy Hamilton from TerraTap who we spoke to on the Living Myth Magazine Podcast about their app neartuit which was used as a method of quest messaging throughout the interactive art piece. Your quests are to help “The Birds” do things and interact with them on a personal level. The birds you will encounter are actors stylized to look like the birds they are imitating with anthropomorphized behaviours and styling.

All in all, I enjoyed myself, I appreciated the tandem play aspect of some of the tasks and authentic interactions with the rest of the tasks. I appreciated the improv aspect of the interactions too.

Photo Credit – Luke Redmond – Fowl Play – Flirting Peacock

If you are in New Westminster on September 20th and 21st and are near the Anvil Centre at 6:30PM stop by Fowl Play and play! The show is an hour long and definitely a joyful experience and best of all FREE! FREE PUBLIC INTERACTIVE THEATRE! SERIOUSLY! HOW CAN YOU NOT!

Photo Credit – Luke Redmond – Fowl Play – Graceful Swan

Below we have an interview with Matchstick Productions about the show and we will also include a link to our podcast where we talk about neartuit.

_____________________________________________________________________________

LM: Can you give a history of the project?
MP: The show started out as a response to the current exhibit at the New Media Gallery. This exhibit, titled Dominion, explores themes of human domination over nature. It also heavily incorporates birds, with its mainstay piece showing birds of paradise and hummingbirds in a dazzling zoetrope. We have integrated these themes into a game style show.

LM: How long did it take to have the performers ready? 
MP: We started seriously workshopping about 2 months ago, but only took its final form about a week and a half ago. A piece like this evolves constantly and we hope it can adapt to audience needs.
 
LM: Who did the costuming and the writing? 
 
MP: Costuming was a collaboration between Jess Redmond, Emily Matchette, and Zakk Harris. They included birdlike elements and colours into each costume. The writing was a team collaboration mostly but was headed by Isaac Caverzan.
 
LM: Can you tell us on how iBeacon/neartuit was integrated into the piece? 
 
MP: We used the iBeacon technology to help augment the information given to the audience. As they go through the show the neartuit app will help locate and also give additional information on the various birds. It is, however, not mandatory, and the show can be completely navigated using pen and paper!

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458

Culture, Interviews, Lifestyle, Opinion, Podcast, Tech, Why Aren't You Watching This?

September 6, 2017

Welcome to the third episode of Living Myth Magazine Podcast.

We are glad you are spending some time with us.

Your hosts Anne Honeycutt and Aaron Golden really appreciate you.

This episode features two interviews, a talk between Anne and Aaron about the current creative Zeitgeist and a piece of music created by wonderful creatives.

September is not only Fringe month but it is also a great time to reconnect with people and community and also celebrate the technology we use to do that.

So, this episode is all about how technology creatives help us learn about and build up our communities!

http://livingmythmedia.libsyn.com/living-myth-magazine-podcast-episode-3-september-2017

Interview 1:

NEARTUIT – HOW INTERACTIVE MAPS HELP CREATIVES CURATE AND EXPLORE ART with Judy Hamilton

Judy Hamilton of TerraTap and her Chief Technological Officer created Neartuit which is an interactive map system that automatically tells you cool things about a cool thing when you get close to the cool thing. They have been helping creatives and curators around the Greater Vancouver Area create interactive smart phone friendly content that allows the consumer to be informed and delighted.

Here are links to download the apps onto your tiny hand sized computers!

http://www.neartuit.com/app/

You can also see their work on display at The City Of New Westminster Museum & Archives  and at The New Media Gallery

Interview 2:

PLAYPALS THE FIRST APP YOU CAN USE TO TABLETOP GAME WITH EVERYONE with Arik Sternbeg

Jalyn Euteneier of our 0D20 property interviews Arik Stenberg about PlayPals and the importance of building community through gaming. When this interview was recorded in July the app was a few weeks old, but now it is September and it is doing AMAZING!

Here are links to download the apps onto your tiny hand sized computers

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.play_pals

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/playpals-discover-local-tabletop-game-events/id1207049719?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

 

Then…

Anne and Aaron talk about Sarahah and how Anne and Avens O’Brien have used it to become better people and/or interact with fans.

As promised we have set up one for the magazine and podcast network. https://livingmythmag.sarahah.com/

The end music for this month was suggested to us by the Vancouver Chipmusic Society and it is called Half Steppin’ and it is by virt, Freaky DNA and Norrin Radd

 

And there we have it, thanks so much for spending time with us!

Do you like what you heard? Do you want us to celebrate your creativity creatively? Drop us a line at podcasts@livingmythmedia.com and Anne will totally get back to you 😀

 

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374

Fringe Interview – Scientist Turned Comedian, Tim Lee

Comedy, Culture, Events, FRINGE!!, Interviews, Performance, Showcase, Tech, Why Aren't You Watching This?

September 6, 2017

As part of our Vancouver Fringe Festival coverage we would like to introduce you to Tim Lee – Scientist Turned Comedian. We sat down with Tim and asked him questions! Here is the results! With pictures and diagrams.

“You know how Larry the Cable Guy’s act pretty much consists of him yelling “Git ‘er done!” every five minutes or so? Scientist-turned-comic Tim Lee’s material is the diametric opposite. Lee, who got his PhD before realizing where his true talents lay, blends science talk (complete with PowerPoint presentations) with comedy. The hilarious result is like what would happen if you crossed your high-school chem teacher with George Carlin”
– The Boston Phoenix”

LM: Can you give a brief but interesting history of Scientist Turned Comedian?

TL: When I was in grad school I used to throw gag slides into my talks. I find that a little humor relaxes the mind. When I started comedy I was performing regularly at a bar in Palo Alto that had a PowerPoint setup so I brought back some of those gag slides and put them into my standup act. The audience loved it!

LM: Why did you choose to perform in Vancouver?
TL: I’ve heard Vancouver has a wonderful performing arts scene. I want to experience it myself.

LM: Do you have a favourite scientist?
TL: I named my children after Edison and Faraday. The reason I like them so much, besides their influential body of work, is that they are both self educated. Edison was a child laborer who was beaten so hard at his job that he lost his hearing. He only went to school for three months. Faraday also had little formal education. It was their curiosity that drove them to greatness. I’m inspired because they were both were driven by the joy of discovery. It drives me to keep discovering and I hope it will inspire my kids as well.

LM: Do you have a favourite science fiction character?
TL: I hate to say it but it’s probably James T Kirk. I find him both humorous and oddly inspiring. Only someone as clueless as William Shatner could have taken writing that went right over his head and turned it into a classic role.

LM: What are your top 4 road trip songs?

TL:

Road to Nowhere – Talking Heads
Take it Easy – Eagles
Smells Like Teen Spirit – Nirvana
Sympathy for the Devil – Rolling Stones

LM: If you were early to get to your plane and you had 20$ what would you spend it on?
TL: Iced tea and smokehouse almonds.

The show is from September 7th – 17th, 2017 and you can buy tickets here!  The show will be at the False Creek community Centre on Granville Island.

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1072

Culture as Commodity

Culture, Opinion, Tech, The Truth

August 5, 2015

Bear with me here, because I swear there is a multi-layered point I’m going to make, and it might just blow your mind.

There was this Pokemon commercial that played way back when, one of the earliest of its breed. The premise was a black-and-white world, crowds of people in a hurry to get nowhere, and in the midst of it color would blossom. Children in full vibrancy would stand and look skyward, and a narrator spoke about an awakening, about how few were aware of the change that was coming to the world. Pokemon was mentioned only in the outro, the product little more than an afterthought.

Pokemon is successful, yes, but the product is the least part of what that brand sells. They’re pushing a culture based on the idea of collection and co-operative competition, where the best people aspire to make themselves and everyone else around them better. Only the villains are in it for their own gains and victory, and their pride and their greed makes them laughable and pathetic. It’s the desire to be the best for the sake of being the best that becomes the core theme of that culture, and it all goes back to that first commercial, pushing awakening instead of product.

Pictured: Cartoon Evil.

Pictured: Cartoon Evil.

That’s been an on-going thing for decades now, since flickering fictions became a means of conveying meaning and depth. We moved from novels to radio to movies to television to YouTube to Netflix, historically speaking, in the blink of an eye. The information most likely to stick with you doesn’t come from dry history but from the stories around it, the recreations and tales that we tell ourselves.

When we as a species first started sharing stories on a national stage, the world changed.

See, when we started sharing our stories we started sharing and contrasting our cultural norms. Philosophies that had existed only in the bubble of their geographic range were allowed to move beyond those borders for the first time. Descartes and Socrates met with Lao Tze and al Razi. The ability to sell culture led to the idea of created wealth, which meant that we could move beyond the idea of land, access, or minerals being the sole measures of value.

"Wait. Philosophers that weren't Greek or from Europe?"

“Wait. Philosophers that weren’t Greek or from Europe?”

This idea was what allowed the United States to flourish and become a super power. By exporting culture as commodity worldwide and selling people on the idea of the American Dream – whereby anyone could become royalty through passion, dedication, and intelligence – the United States was able to become the wealthiest nation the world had ever seen, and to foster an environment of unprecedented growth.

Yes, they had problems along the way, but the consistent progress they were able to make as a culture allowed them to continue to be a powerhouse, right up until they crippled their culture for shortsighted political and economic gains that were what the United States constitution had been drafted to distance themselves from in the first place.

Sadly, most of the people that talk about that constitution have never read it, certainly don’t understand it, and are in the process of killing it. They’ve murdered their own culture for no good reason, and more than just their nation is failing because of it.

A culture without integrity is doomed to failure, and the United States would increasingly rather celebrate an old world that never existed rather than help create a new and better one. This means that they’re falling back into old habit patterns and ways of thinking that don’t really apply, and the only people that are challenging them are – wait for it – the geeks that spent so long being ridiculed for their intelligence.

If you need proof of this, look at Star Trek. A single show promised a better future – equality of races and sexes through the end of toxic patriotism, patriarchy and scarcity economics by means of technology. In the decades since, people adopted the tenants and culture of Star Trek as personal ideologies. They were mocked for it, of course, as intelligence became increasingly vilified by those with a vested interest in keeping scarcity economics a thing.

Pictured: The new line of products from Apple.

Pictured: The new line of products from Apple.

The trick of it was, they were using tools crafted by intelligent people to push their anti-intelligent agenda.

And the Star Trek fans? The ones that had internalized the culture of that show enough to look into science, engineering, and philosophy? They went about creating the technologies of that culture and pushing them as commodities for public consumption.

Cell phones? Star Trek. Smart phones? Star Trek again. iPads? Star Trek yet again.

As the technologies became accepted, so did the culture that came with them – the inclusive cultures, the ones that pushed for the world to be better. The one that wouldn’t turn a blind eye to systematic racism and sexism, to so-called acceptable levels of political and economic corruption.

There’s a whole thing that became popular about supporting the lesser evil, but intelligence will not and cannot accept evil as a choice; as a culture, we aim for the greatest good. And what culture is this, that pushes ideals of progress, integrity, and inclusion? Geek culture. The culture that grew out of Lord of the Rings and comic books and Star Trek.

Why do you think we spend so much time talking about geeky things?

The culture around those things is the birthplace of everything that is going to matter.

When you buy a tablet, you’re not buying a piece of technology: you’re buying a means of gathering and ingesting culture, and everything that goes with it. When you go see Iron Man in theaters you’re watching a story about a man seeking to better himself and the world through co-operative competition with his friends and allies, while the villains become pathetic and laughable because of their pride and greed.

Pictured: Cartoon Evil.

Pictured: Cartoon Evil.

Which brings us back to Pokemon and that commercial we started this out on.

See, the trick of that commercial was that, yes, it was pushing a culture – but not just the culture of Pokemon. The resonance of that commercial came from it speaking of of a global change, an awakening to a greater power and a greater responsibility.

The world we are moving into is one of fantastic possibility, where the prejudices and hatreds of the past will be nothing more than the shades of a world that no longer matters. When culture becomes commodity, the culture with the greatest level of integrity and inclusiveness wins.

Few were aware of the change that was coming to the world, but the change is here and it’s gonna catch us all.

Mind = blown.

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Net Neutrality – Here We Go Again

Fail, Tech, The Truth

April 23, 2015

Comcast, Verizon, and all their ilk have slithered out of their offices to appeal to the people that understand the Internet least – the Republicans and GOP – in an effort to kill the Internet.

You like the Internet, right? We all do. It’s a life-changing technology that literally changes everything, from distribution models to research to access of information. It’s moving society forward and making it better, increasing our understanding of the world around us on every possible level. (more…)

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1535

Retron 5 [Review]

Culture, Reviews, Tech

July 15, 2014

retron5 contBack at North West Fan Fest, we happened across a storefront for a place in the mythical land of Coquitlam.

“Good con to you, worthy friend,” quoth the Merchant. “Please, please, come closer – not too close! – for I have the most wonderful of all treasures. You look like a child of the Nintendo generation, one who remembers the 16-bit wars. Did you ever dream of a system that plays those games from all those systems? Perhaps with the capacity to play games from the Super Famicom and Game Boy Advance variety, as well…?”

“Such a thing would be a marvel,” responded I, walking forward with awe and trembling.

“Not only do I possess such a system, but it also will pretty up your graphics, smoothing pixels out to give you somewhat like high definition,” said he. “It also possesses a wireless controller of its own native design, but it will use controllers from the old systems as well.”

“I currently have no children,” I told him. “I’m getting married soon. Do you take layaway deposits?” (more…)

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1041

Electronic Entertainment Expo 2014

Tech

June 9, 2014

 

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